Nootropics and Traumatic Brain Injury Nootropics and Traumatic Brain Injury
There are more than 200,000 traumatic brain injuries diagnosed in the United States each year. While you might expect this type of injury to... Nootropics and Traumatic Brain Injury

There are more than 200,000 traumatic brain injuries diagnosed in the United States each year. While you might expect this type of injury to occur with our soldiers and football players, it impacts a much wider segment of the population. Falling off the monkey bars, taking a tumble off your bicycle or being slammed by a swinging object can all result in debilitating injury.

The causes and ramifications of a traumatic brain injury are as varied as the people who sustain them. Some people recover quickly and suffer little long-term impact. Others die. Though young adults and the elderly are most at risk, a traumatic brain injury can literally hit anyone at any time. It should come as little surprise, then, that combating the impact of this type of injury is a high priority.

Nootropics can help. A recent study out of Alexandria University in Egypt looks at a range of nootropic agents, comparing and contrasting them in light of their effectiveness in neural rejuvenation following a traumatic brain injury event. More specifically, researchers considered patients who were using cerebrolysin, citicoline and piracetam. Parent results were then analyzed using the Glasgow outcome score, cognitive performance, and survival rates. A review of the literature revealed thirteen relevant studies.

In studies where patients had been using cerebrolysin, GOS and cognitive skills were improved by a factor of roughly three when compared to control groups. Those patients using citicoline saw little difference when compared to the control, and one study showed that patients using piracetam saw improved cognitive functioning.

The take home message here is two-fold. First, nootropics can help people who have suffered traumatic brain injuries. Second, not all nootropics are created equal for every potential situation. Though cerebrolysin is not the most popular nootropic on the market, in some cases it may offer a better outcome than its competitors.

 

 

Mackenzie Lovett

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